Renting is Fashionable These Days

Image from: https://royaltenant.com/blog/blog/rent-vs-buy/
Image from: https://royaltenant.com/blog/blog/rent-vs-buy/

Among the various evolutions Britain is undergoing is its acceptance of renting homes. A sudden decline in homeownership depicts the UK’s new perspective on accommodation: the percentage of householders who own their homes has dropped by 7% since homeownership hit its peak in 2003.

The emergence of the Generation Rent is illustrated by research from PwC, revealing that almost 60% of 20-39 year-olds in England will rent their homes by 2025 with only 26% getting on the housing ladder. Concertedly, government data reveals that the private rented sector has doubled in size since 2004, with almost 50% of people in England aged 25 to 34 paying a private landlord for their accommodation. These statistics point towards a booming buy-to-let sector, with the younger generation playing a very big role.

Worth noting is a more personal perspective on renting. A survey released in January, 2018, reveal that three-quarters of British adults aged 18 to 30 don’t believe they will ever be able to afford to buy a home even though they have full-time jobs.

Philip, 26, from Yorkshire, said this of his experience so far: “By the time you have saved up an extra £1000 towards a deposit, the house values have gone up by £2k, £5k, £10k. It’s impossible.”

Some, like Jamie, a Business Manager for a Health GP Company in Northumberland, have a slightly different view.

“I have no issues with (renting). There is, to a degree, temporised value; you can often live in a nicer area, nicer street etc. for a cheaper monthly payment than a mortgage payment. Some see renting as ‘throwing money down the drain’ but I see it differently. Renting allows you to become, in some odd regard, a more static member of the travelling community.” he says.

Jamie’s welcoming attitude mirrors the widespread acceptance of renting throughout the rest of Europe. In France, just over 50% of the population live in their own properties. And in Paris, the figure is less than one in three. In Germany, house ownership is even more scarce. Only 39% of Germans own the homes that they live in, and in Berlin this figure dwindles down to just a mere 13% of the population owning their own home!

With projections seeing Britain as a new nation of renters, here are 5 reasons why the buy-to-let sector will remain crucial in the UK for some time to come:

1. It’s about 20% cheaper to rent a home in the UK on a monthly basis than to buy (Savills)

Savills calculated the cost of buying vs renting a home. Image credit: http://on.ft.com/2eKm5kU
Savills calculated the cost of buying vs renting a home. Image credit: http://on.ft.com/2eKm5kU

Back in 1996 renting a home used to be 25% more expensive than owning one but in 2007, it became 79% cheaper to rent than to own! According to Savill’s calculation, for a first-time buyer’s monthly costs to be lower than the costs of renting, the purchaser would require, on average, a deposit of at least 39% of the value of the property!

2. Reason #2: House prices greatly surpass wage growth

Growth in house prices vs wages in the UK as at Jan 2016: While UK house prices increased by 7.9% last year, figures from ONS show that the UK median wage increased by just 1.8%. This suggests that house prices are growing more than four times as fast as median wages. Source: ONS. Image credit: http://bit.ly/1SjLa5f
Growth in house prices vs wages in the UK as at Jan 2016: While UK house prices increased by 7.9% last year, figures from ONS show that the UK median wage increased by just 1.8%. This suggests that house prices are growing more than four times as fast as median wages. Source: ONS. Image credit: http://bit.ly/1SjLa5f

A typical home in the UK now costs six times average annual earnings despite slowing house price inflation. According to Nationwide, house prices have risen by 20% over the last three years while wages rose by just 6% — the average price of a house in England today is 6 times the average price it was 3 decades ago!

3. Private rented sector – biggest provider of rented homes

Renting privately is now the norm, according to a PwC report, for those who cannot afford to buy but do not qualify for social housing. By 2025, PwC predicts that 7.2m households will be in rented accommodation, compared with 5.4m today and just 2.3m in 2001. Source: PwC. Image credit: Guardian http://bit.ly/2eTdslz
Renting privately is now the norm, according to a PwC report, for those who cannot afford to buy but do not qualify for social housing. By 2025, PwC predicts that 7.2m households will be in rented accommodation, compared with 5.4m today and just 2.3m in 2001. Source: PwC. Image credit: Guardian http://bit.ly/2eTdslz

The private rented sector has taken over from councils and housing associations as the biggest provider of rented homes with prices paid by tenants in Britain increasing by 2.3% in the 12 months to Sept 2016, according to latest official data.

4. The UK has an undersupply of housing

Housing supply in the UK sharply declines at the end of 2007. Image credit: http://www.prefabmarket.com/uk-housing-crisis-prefab-construction/
Housing supply in the UK sharply declines at the end of 2007. Image credit: http://www.prefabmarket.com/uk-housing-crisis-prefab-construction/

The UK is currently facing the worst housing undersupply since the Second World War. In late 2015, the BBC published an incriminating article on the shortage of housing in the UK, citing the Labour government’s failure to build 240,000 homes by 2016 — a target set in 2007. Brexit-backer Iain Duncan Smith said the UK would need to build 240 houses a day for 20 years to cope with increased demand. The outcome of low supply and high demand are skyrocketing prices. With house prices being raised at unaffordable rates, the best bet would be to rent.

5. Renting: The Preferred Lifestyle

Home ownership is clearly declining among those within the younger age group. This is caused by a number of reasons including affordability and, increasingly, preference (lifestyle).
Home ownership is clearly declining among those within the younger age group. This is caused by a number of reasons including affordability and, increasingly, preference (lifestyle).

While some decide to rent due to economic reasons, some are choosing it based on lifestyle. Millenials are choosing to settle down later in life as they switch jobs and careers more often than their parents. A research conducted by AXA discovered that less than 50% of the research participants are renting because they cannot afford it. The research revealed that many enjoy the freedom and flexibility of being mortgage-free.

With the potential of the buy-to-let sector being a means for lucrative returns already established, the shrewd investor would find it in their best interest to know where, exactly, to get the highest rental yields in the UK! Liverpool and Manchester, specifically, provide great returns!

Hello Manchester, Farewell London!

Saving hard, but you can’t quite put aside  enough? Thinking of putting your money to work by investing in UK?

Here are 4 things you should know before deciding where to invest. Invest in property located in areas with

  • Stronger currency
  • Stronger and stable economy
  • Rapid job growth
  • Vast education opportunities

This impacts the returns on your investment apart from increasing the value and ‘rentability’ of your property. Capital growth is also key to property investment. The greater the growth in property value,, the bigger the total profits.

UK has always been a haven for property investors. But, as London property prices soar higher and yields go lower, property in the cities outside London are showing greater yield potential. The Brits, too, are starting to show interest in properties outside of London.  Indeed, it is now the regional cities in which you should put your money! Before you decide where to invest, take a quick a look at HSBC’s annual research on rental yield around Britain. Thank me later.

The data shows Manchester leading the pack in rental yields, as well as several other locations with profitable returns.

But if it’s only London property for you, you might find this link helpful: http://bit.ly/1J5P4co

 

Liverpool, Manchester Named UK’s Top Buy-to-Let Market Again

 Image by Totally Money indicates rental yields across the maritime city of Liverpool.
Image by Totally Money indicates rental yields across the maritime city of Liverpool.

Liverpool, home to the UK’s first-of-its-kind Knowledge Quarter, has been named UK’s top buy-to-let city for yet again. The city has been a top pick for the rental market since 2013 .

The research by independent credit broker TotallyMoney, which surveyed 580,000 properties across England, Scotland and Wales, found that universities outside London provided landlords with the highest yields, with Liverpool claiming top spot at up to 12% average rental yields.

The L6 and L7 postcodes in Liverpool dominated due to its cheaper prices, but also, most importantly, because of their  location which is close to the city’s three main universities. The universities provide a catchment of some 70,000 students, which drive demand for housing.

Landlords have even more to rejoice about as the upcoming construction of the high-speed rail , and (HS2) will continue to boost the economy in Liverpool, thus  driving demand for housing creating opportunities for the buy-to-let investors.

The best buy-to-let cities in Britain

Figure shows two postcodes in Liverpool dominated the top buy-to-let in Britain.
Figures show Liverpool dominating the top ranks of the buy-to-let market in Britain. Info source: Totally Money

Liverpool & Manchester to benefit from Northern Powerhouse development,job vacancy and infrastructural growth

Liverpool is a core city of the UK's Northern Powerhouse. Image from Urbanrealm
Liverpool is a core city of the UK’s Northern Powerhouse. Image from Urbanrealm

Meanwhile, the housing market in Manchester has also been doing well, recording strong average rental yields of up to 10.08%.

Recently, Manchester was also named as the best place to be a landlord in the UK, recording a splendid rental price growth of 5.76%!

Like Liverpool, Manchester is also a part of the Northern Powerhouse, an initiative by the  UK government to create economic balance between the North and South.

Both Liverpool and Manchester will see great development in the future in terms of job opportunities, training, and skills development — a situation that smart property investors  are taking advantage of.

In Liverpool, part of the city’s development involves the massive Liverpool Waters scheme, which will reconstruct brownfield sites into full-fledged neighbourhoods and transform the city’s northern docks into a world-class mixed-use waterfront development.

In Manchester, the population continues growing, thanks in large part to the existence of four central universities which have enforced the student population in the city. With a student catchment of some 100,000, Manchester offers good opportunities for landlords.

London’s lacklustre performance

In the past, London was the main focus of investors looking to capitalise on its massive economic and infrastructure growth as the city centre of UK. Today, Liverpool and Manchester have eclipsed the capital thanks to its strong and varied development growth.

Property yields have not done well in London either due to over inflated property prices. Housing prices have flatlined, with experts predicting that Brexit will cause a downfall in the market based on current trends. What’s clear is that rental yields in Liverpool is seven times higher than London, which unfortunately now sports a high number of postcodes that are listed within some of the UK’s worst areas for buy-to-let yields.